Sunday, June 26, 2005

Take a look at Wikis

Wiki Targets How-To Buffs

If you are thinking about starting a new site, one thing to consider is the Wiki model. From the article:
    Hannah launched the wiki in February as an extension of eHow.com, another website that he bought last year. EHow had once been a promising internet startup, but the site fell into disrepair following the collapse of the dot-com bubble four years ago. Its database contains close to 100,000 pages of assorted how-to instructions, but without regular updating, entries were looking stale.

    By launching a volunteer-supported site for how-to directions, Hannah saw a way out of the staleness problem. Because anyone can edit or add information on a wiki, an active group of volunteers ought to ensure that postings are up-to-date.
It is fairly easy to set a Wiki up using open source software (e.g. TikiWiki, phpWiki). Then it is just a matter of attracting an audience that is willing to get involved.

6 Comments:

At 11:07 PM, Blogger dustin said...

Wiki are cool. I have one on my site and it generates some fun entries. A word of warning though: spammers like to target Wikis (just like everything else). You should use a Wiki that supports accounts to login and edit, or else spammers will hurt you.

 
At 9:58 AM, Blogger Blaine Moore said...

Even with login accounts you will still need to spend some time weeding out the spam entries.

 
At 10:41 PM, Anonymous William said...

My experience has been that people are very loath to contribute to websites. It seems like you have to his this magical "critical mass" before it takes off, and THAT involves a lot of effort.

I'm still trying to get there ...

 
At 11:31 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

See Riters.com, a free wiki farm

 
At 11:35 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

The Wonderful World of Wikis

 
At 11:04 PM, Blogger Zack said...

I had a pretty popular website back before the days that such wide-spread user contribution wasn't so easily implemented into a website's basic design and I still received roughly 50 emails a day from users wishing to add or correct information on the site. Nowadays, such as with my recent site www.ReallyWeird.net, which uses a very intuitive user contribution system (php-fusion), it seems that almost 0% of the site population contribute while the others just sit there and take up my bandwidth, versus roughly 20% on the old site.

 

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